Basics + Techniques | Sewing

How to Use the Satin Stitch or Open Toe Foot

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Inside: How to Use the Satin Stitch or Open Toe Foot

Get out your sewing machine manual because today I’m highlighting another sewing machine foot, as in the Satin Stitch or Open-Toe Foot. The Open Toe Foot is the best choice for those unused decorative stitches that came with your machine.

How to Use the Satin Stitch or Open Toe Foot

With an Open Toe Foot you are only limited by your own creativity ~ applique, embroidery, hemstitching, satin stitching, heirloom stitching, and twin-needle stitching. I’ve even seen this foot used for smocking.

What makes this foot so unique is the wide opening which allows complete visibility. It also has shorter toes which makes it easier to go around curves ~ which can be very useful if you are satin stitching.

Do you love to use decorative stitches in your sewing and applique projects? If so, then you need a Satin Stitch or Open Toe Foot. The groove on the back makes it perfect for sliding over dense stitches. Sewing is easy when you know which presser foot to use.

Another feature of the Open Toe Foot is the indention on the underside.

Do you love to use decorative stitches in your sewing and applique projects? If so, then you need a Satin Stitch or Open Toe Foot. The groove on the back makes it perfect for sliding over dense stitches. Sewing is easy when you know which presser foot to use.

The wedge shape indention on the underside of the foot will keep the foot from dragging over heavy stitching, such as satin stitching.

Notice how easy it is to see exactly where you are stitching, especially on something like this with lots and lots of curves. The wedge shape on the underside of the foot makes this type of satin stitching a breeze because it allows for easy turning.

Do you love to use decorative stitches in your sewing and applique projects? If so, then you need a Satin Stitch or Open Toe Foot. The groove on the back makes it perfect for sliding over dense stitches. Sewing is easy when you know which presser foot to use.

The Open Toe Foot becomes invaluable when sewing with decorative stitches, especially in applique. When attaching an applique it is necessary to see where your needle is at all times and the open toe foot allows for this. When the applique has lots of curves, the Open Toe Foot is at its best.

Think about all of the possibilities using decorative stitches and decorative threads. It’s endless.

Do you love to use decorative stitches in your sewing and applique projects? If so, then you need a Satin Stitch or Open Toe Foot. The groove on the back makes it perfect for sliding over dense stitches. Sewing is easy when you know which presser foot to use.

A lot of sewing techniques call for specialty needles such as a twin needle or a wing needle. Sewing with specialty needles sometimes means you are stitching on a fixed line. The Open Toe Foot allows you to see exactly where your specialty needle is at all times.

Do you love to use decorative stitches in your sewing and applique projects? If so, then you need a Satin Stitch or Open Toe Foot. The groove on the back makes it perfect for sliding over dense stitches. Sewing is easy when you know which presser foot to use.

Years ago (like the 80’s) before machine embroidery was available for home use, sewists had to be creative and attach applique’s using satin stitching or decorative stitching. This foot was vital for these applications. While perfect satin stitching can take a bit of practice, a twin needle, an Open Toe Foot, and a zigzag stitch can create some amazing embellishments.

Don’t be afraid to try this foot out. For most machines, the foot can be purchased for less than $20. That’s a small price to pay for unlimited creative possibilities. Check here for an Open Toe Foot that will fit your machine. (affiliate)


—>Click this link to learn about other sewing machine feet!


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24 Comments

  1. I have enjoyed the information on the different sewing machine feet. I love using my open toe foot. I recently have been making a 1930s butterfly quilt. I used my open toe foot to go around each butterfly with a blanket stitch. I used a heavier thread than regular sewing thread so that it would show up as if I had hand buttonholed around the butterflys. I use paper towels for a stabilizer. They are inexpensive to use and tear away very easily and I get very good results.

  2. I have a question. How did you do the cross stitch on your sample? I love it and would like to be able to do it too. If it is a machine stitch I’ll be so dissapointed since I know my machine doesn’t have that stitch.
    Thanks Leslie
    PS I enjoy getting my Seasoned homemaker news It is always so informative.

  3. Thanks for this post! I had no idea such a foot existed, but I’ll have to look for one next time I want to applique. Also, the paper towel trick from Irene is fabulous!

  4. Great post! I am kind of clueless with sewing and am just starting to get into (slowly but surely) so now my knowledge on sewing has been expanded! lol
    Morgaine from Madcap Frenzy (new follower here!)

  5. I never have seen an open toe foot! I’m going to ask my mom if she uses one because I think she would find it helpful.

  6. Open toe foot. Never heard of it.i do a lot of decorating on little girls dresses. Investigating if I can find one at a reasonable price. Unfortunately anything from US currency is expensive for us here.?

  7. Thank you so much for all the information, short and concise on exactly what this wondrous foot is capable off. I have one in the mail, I can’t wait!

  8. I can see that you are using a Bernina machine…which one are you using… I have the 330- which stitch are you using #?
    Thanks

    1. When I wrote this post I was using a Bernina 640. I now have a B 790. I can’t remember which stitch this was, but I’m sure it’s one of the decorative stitches.

  9. Is the open toe foot the same as the satin stitch foot? Also could you explain how paper towels could be used as stabilizer and how would it be torn off? Sorry I’m new at this. Thank you.

    1. The Open Toe foot is a Satin Stitch foot. I’ve never used paper towels to stabilize, so I cannot comment with any authority.

  10. Well I’m sure these questions are going to seem dumb, but I’m new to applique, but not new to sewing.
    Can I ask
    …if I use heat bond fusible web before machine applique, is the stabilizer still necessary? And, should I assume, when using stabilizing material, the item is not machine washable?
    Thank you Deborah

    1. I always recommend stabilizing fabric. Your appliqués turn out so much better and you don’t get tunneling on your stitches.

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